11 Incredible Slow-Flow Yoga Poses To Keep In Your Practice Regimen

Slow Flow Yoga is a practice that is gaining in popularity among yogis of all levels. It combines the traditional hatha yoga poses with slow, rhythmic movements and breathwork.

This type of practice allows you to focus on your alignment and breath while moving at a much slower pace than in a more dynamic or vigorous style class.

Slow Flow Yoga has a number of benefits and can be an effective way to relax and release tension in the body.

We took a closer look at just what we mean by slow yoga, the benefits it can offer, and the poses that you should be adding to your workout routine.

What Is Slow Yoga?

Slow yoga is a type of yoga practice that emphasizes mindful movements and deep breathing. It’s designed to bring awareness to the body and breath, help cultivate relaxation, and foster an internal sense of calm.

As the name suggests, slow-flow classes often tie postures together with long pauses in between—allowing practitioners to move more intuitively and connect with their bodies on a deeper level.

Slow flow can be a great way for beginners to ease into yoga, or for more experienced yogis to deepen their practice.

What Are The Benefits Of Slow Yoga

Slow yoga has a number of benefits, both physical and mental, and these include:

Improved Posture And Flexibility

Slow yoga can help to improve posture, as it gives practitioners the time to focus on correct alignment and form. By slowing down their movements, practitioners can also increase their range of motion, helping them to become more flexible over time.

Increased Body Awareness

Moving slowly allows you to become more aware of the sensations in your body. You’ll be able to better identify areas of tightness or tension, and learn how to move into postures with greater ease and grace.

Stress Reduction

The slower pace of slow yoga encourages deep breathing, which can help reduce stress levels and promote relaxation. The mindful movements also help to clear the mind, allowing you to feel more centered and present in the moment.

Increased Balance And Strength

Slow yoga can help to improve balance and strength, as practitioners have time to build up their muscles. Moving slowly also allows practitioners to really focus on their alignment, which can help them to build stronger and more stable poses over time.

Improved Concentration

The mindful movements in slow yoga can help practitioners hone their concentration skills, as they are encouraged to stay focused on their breath and movement. This can then be taken off the mat, helping to improve focus in everyday life.

Best Poses For Slow Flow Yoga Poses

So, where should you start with your slow-flow yoga routine? Well, here are some great poses to help you get started.

1. Cat-Cow

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Cat-Cow is a great pose to start off any slow-flow yoga practice. It helps to warm up and stretch the spine while massaging the abdominal organs, improving digestion, and increasing circulation throughout the body.

To perform cat-cow, come to a tabletop position on your hands and knees. Inhale as you arch your back and drop your belly towards the floor, gazing up at the ceiling.

Exhale as you round your spine, tucking your chin towards your chest. Continue to move between these two postures for several rounds of breath.

2. Bridge Pose

Bridge Pose is a wonderful way to open up the chest, shoulders, and hips. It also helps to strengthen and stretch the legs, while improving posture.

Bridge pose can be achieved by lying on your back with your feet flat on the floor and knees bent. Inhale as you press your feet into the ground and lift your hips towards the ceiling.

Hold here for several breaths before releasing your hips back down to the floor.

3. Half Lord Of The Fishes Pose

Half Lord of the Fishes Pose is a great twist to add to your slow-flow practice. It helps to open up the chest, shoulders, and hips, while also massaging the abdominal organs and improving digestion.

This pose begins in a seated position on your mat with both legs extended out in front of you. Cross your right leg over your left, so that your right foot is resting near your left hip.

Inhale as you lengthen your spine, and then exhale as you twist towards the right. Hold for several breaths, then switch sides.

4. Downward-Facing Dog

Downward Facing Dog is a classic pose that stretches and strengthens the entire body. It helps to open up the shoulders and chest, while also stretching out the hamstrings and calves.

To perform downward facing dog, come onto your hands and knees, and then tuck your toes under. Lift your hips towards the ceiling as you press your hands firmly into the ground. Hold for several breaths before releasing back down to all fours.

5. Pigeon Pose

Pigeon pose is a great hip opener, and can be a welcome reprieve from the hustle and bustle of everyday life. To move your body into pigeon pose, start in a downward-facing dog.

Then bring your right knee forward towards your right wrist, and slowly lower your hips to the ground. Hold here for several breaths before switching sides.

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6. Chair Pose

Chair pose is a great pose to add to your slow flow practice. It helps to strengthen and tone the legs, while also stretching out the chest and shoulders.

To perform chair pose, begin by standing with your feet hip distance apart and your arms at your sides. Then inhale as you bend your knees, bringing your thighs parallel with the ground.

Reach your arms up towards the ceiling, and hold here for several breaths.

7. Standing Forward Fold

Standing forward fold is a great way to stretch out the hamstrings and back while calming the mind. A standing forward fold can be achieved by standing with your feet hip distance apart and your arms at your sides.

Inhale as you lengthen your spine, then exhale as you hinge forward at the hips and fold over your legs. Place your hands onto the ground, and hold for several breaths before slowly coming back up to standing.

8. Child’s Pose

Child’s pose is the perfect way to end a slow-flow practice. It helps to stretch out the lower back and hips while calming the mind and body.

To perform child’s pose, kneel on your mat with your big toes touching and your knees hip distance apart. Then sit back onto your heels and lower your torso towards the ground.

Place your forehead on the ground, and hold here for several breaths before slowly coming back up to kneeling.

9. Warrior II Pose

Warrior II Pose is a great way to build strength and stamina in the legs and hips, while also improving balance and focus.

To achieve Warrior II, stand with your feet wide apart and turn your right foot out to the side. Bend your right knee so that it lines up over your right ankle, and bring your arms out to the sides of your body.

Hold here for several breaths before switching sides.

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10. Eagle Pose

Eagle Pose is a great posture to help improve balance and concentration. To move into eagle pose, stand with your feet hip-distance apart and your arms at your sides.

Bend both of your knees slightly, and then cross your right thigh over your left. Take hold of either side of the right foot with the opposite hand, and then lift both arms up in front of you.

Hold here, while focusing on your breath, for several breaths before switching sides.

11. Tree Pose

Tree pose is a balancing pose that helps to strengthen the legs and core, while also improving balance and focus. To reach tree pose, stand with your feet hip-distance apart and your arms at your sides.

Move your weight onto your right foot, then lift your left foot off the ground. Bend your left knee, and then slowly place the sole of the left foot against the inside of your right thigh.

Hold here, while focusing on your breath, for several breaths before switching sides.

Final Thoughts

Slow-flow yoga can be a great way to improve your flexibility, strength, focus, and concentration. These eleven poses are a great starting point for your slow-flow practice, but there are many more incredible postures out there to explore!

Be sure to take things at your own pace, and listen to what your body is telling you. With time and patience, you will soon find yourself mastering each of these postures and adding even more challenging poses to your practice.

Laura Simmons
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