What Is Isokinetic Exercise?

There are many different types of exercise that athletes, and those who are just looking to get into shape, use in order to achieve their goals. To a beginner, all of these terms may seem overwhelming.

What Is Isokinetic Exercise?

One of these that often comes up is the concept of isokinetic exercise – but what exactly is this? And how is it used by athletes and fitness buffs? 

If you’re wondering about these questions, then you’ve come to the right place! In this article, we’re going to take a close look at isokinetic exercise and how you can use it to reach your fitness goals.

We’ve also included some additional information for who it is good for, and who might want to avoid it. So let’s get right into it! 

How Does Isokinetic Exercise Work?

Isokinetic exercise is a form of strength and conditioning training that utilizes specialized equipment in order to produce a constant speed of motion. This type of exercise is often used in physical therapy, athletic training, and in rehabilitation programs.

Isokenetic exercise machines provide resistance that will be matched to the user’s force output, resulting in a constant speed of movement.

This can be used to isolate specific muscles or to condition the body to be accustomed to specific movements that can help them in athletic competition. 

Isokinetic Breakdown

Now let’s take a close look at what Isokinetic exercise means and why this is an important word. In short, isokinetic exercise can be broken down into two components: concentric and eccentric. These are the two pillars we can use to understand it. 

Concentric movements occur when the muscle shortens while producing force, while eccentric movements occur when the muscle lengthens while producing force.

Isokinetic exercise machines use resistance that matches the user’s force output, resulting in a constant speed of movement throughout both the concentric and eccentric phases.

The resistance provided by an isokinetic exercise machine can be adjusted to match the user’s ability. This is beneficial for physical therapy patients and athletes because it allows them to work at their own pace and avoid injury.

How Does Isokinetic Exercise Work?

What Is Isokinetic Exercise?

Isokinetic exercise works by providing a constant speed of motion throughout the range of motion. This is achieved by using specialized equipment that provides resistance that matches the user’s force output. 

This resistance is always adjustable, allowing the user to work at their own pace. Isokinetic exercise machines are typically used in physical therapy, rehabilitation, and athletic training.

Physical therapists often use isokinetic exercise to help patients recover from injuries or surgeries. The constant speed of motion helps patients build strength and range of motion while minimizing the risk of re-injury.

Athletic trainers, on the other end of the scale, use isokinetic exercise to help athletes improve their performance and prevent injuries. By working at a constant speed of motion, athletes can improve their strength, power, and endurance while minimizing the risk of overuse injuries.

Who Is Isokinetic Exercise For?

Isokinetic exercise is suitable for a wide range of individuals, including physical therapy patients, athletes, and fitness enthusiasts. It can be used to improve strength, power, endurance, and range of motion.

Physical therapy patients can benefit from isokinetic exercise because it allows them to work at their own pace and build strength without risking re-injury.

Athletes can use isokinetic exercise to improve their performance and prevent injuries, while fitness enthusiasts can incorporate it into their workouts to improve their overall fitness and achieve any specialized fitness goals that they might have. 

Who Should Avoid It?

While isokinetic exercise is generally a good training method for most individuals, there are some who should avoid it. Individuals with joint pain or arthritis may find the constant speed of motion to be uncomfortable or painful.

Additionally, individuals who are pregnant or recovering from a recent surgery should consult with a doctor before beginning any new exercise program, including isokinetic exercise.

Final Thoughts

So that was our short guide on what Isokenetic exercise is. In short, it is a valuable form of strength training that provides a constant speed of motion throughout the range of motion. It is useful for physical therapy patients, athletes, and fitness enthusiasts. 

The adjustable resistance of isokinetic exercise machines allows individuals to work at their own pace and avoid injury. While it is generally safe for most individuals, those with joint pain or arthritis should approach it with caution. 

We hope that this guide has taught you everything you wanted to know about the basics of isokinetic exercise. If you still have some questions, keep reading for our short FAQ section. We wish you the best of luck, and hope that you hit your training goals, no matter what they are! 

Frequently Asked Questions 

Is Isokinetic Exercise The Same Thing As Isotonic Exercise?

These are two fitness terms that are often confused, because of their similarities, however, they are not the same thing.

Isotonic exercise involves using constant weight throughout your movement exercises, in order to create more strength. Isokinetic uses constant speed, and the two types of exercise do slightly different things.

How Often Do People Do Isokinetic Exercise?

The frequency of a session of isokinetic exercise is going to depend on a person’s individual fitness abilities and goals. However, a good rule is that isokinetic exercise should be done two to three times a week for good results.

However, you should know that physical therapy patients may need to do this more frequently as part of their rehabilitation programs.

Can Isokinetic Exercise Be Used To Lose Weight?

It is generally accepted that isokinetic exercise can be used to contribute to weight loss. This happens as it is a way of increasing muscle mass and improving your overall fitness.

However, you’ll need to keep in mind that weight loss requires you to combine it with other things such as a healthy diet, and other forms of exercise for optimal weight loss results. It should not be used in isolation as a one-way ticket for weight loss!  

Laura Simmons
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